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Early sightings

September 24, 2007

 

These large birds, Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, were calling outside my front door. It is a piercing call! Kee-oow! Unmistakable. I thought, hmmm…that sounds like said birds and sure enough, they were perched on the trees out front.  And? Ahh….the earliest sightings of these creatures is December but they usually appear in late January or early February. What are they doing here now? Looking for food?  Drought affected?
For some months, I’ve been ignoring the constant presence of the Sulphur-crested Cockatoos, who normally don’t hang around through the winter but this year a sizeable flock did.  Once established in an area, they do tend to hang around but they usually move down the mountain for the coldest of the winter months or the valley forest.

So, is no pattern the new standard? I’m wondering, who and what will adapt? What do these observations signify?  How long can we keep going and accepting that aspirational energy targets, biofuels and carbon trading are going to get us through?  I don’t know the answers but what I do know, is that I’ve got potatoes to plant and ground to dig over and…….to plant some more habitat/food plants for the visitors who look like they are coming to call more often or here to stay.

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. September 24, 2007 6:57 am

    Spectacular.

    I am just beginning to read. Spectacular.

    What do these birds SOUND like?

    H

  2. September 24, 2007 9:35 pm

    Here is a link with a sound file. You’ll need real player to listen to the sound.

    http://www.mangoverde.com/birdsound/spec/spec73-4.html

    The sound is constant and piercing. One year when they were eating gum nuts from the trees around the house and dropping the shells onto our tin roof, we had to close doors and windows because it was headache inducing. Of course, little could be done to stop the thuds on the roof.

    When they take flight, the word that comes to mind is majestic.

    Thanks for stopping by. I’ve long been a reader – love the footnotes and your
    garden transformation!

  3. September 24, 2007 11:09 pm

    Thank you so much. Excellent.

  4. September 24, 2007 11:09 pm

    I’ll DEFINATELY be back.

    Thank you so much. Excellent.

  5. October 3, 2007 3:51 am

    I love the black cockies. They have a beautiful flying motion, have you noticed? Sort of like they’re moving through liquid – a leisurely fluid wing stroke. Beautiful.

    I also watched one on a banksia serrata once, chomping through a seed pod with a woody stem as thick as my thumb. It may has well have been a limp asparagus stalk.

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