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Goings on

March 28, 2007

pea-shoots.jpg

Planted some peas and broad beans a couple of weeks ago and they are starting to emerge. Also have some argula, parsley, silverbeet growing under plastic – a make-shift polytunnel that will be improved (ie to look nicer than it does now) and hopefully extend our growing of greens through the winter. Got to get the garlic in before the soil gets too cold.

I also ordered some seeds for autumn/winter including some green manure seeds that will go in soon. These are yet to arrive however, the next job for me is to move 1 cubic metre (about a tonne) of mushroom compost from the top of the driveway to the back garden.

gahnia.jpg

The slope is steep and it all has to be carried up in buckets or tubs. I’ve done it before and will do it again. (Motivation – little red engine-ish)

I have avoided this job, however, for the better part of a week. Tomorrow.


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6 Comments leave one →
  1. March 28, 2007 11:29 pm

    Nada, it sounds like a good time for a ‘Compost Party’. I threw a ‘Concreting Party’ when I was laying the floor of my shed and it involved a few guys coming over to cart barrows full of concrete in exchange for a scrumptious morning tea.

    Your vegie gardening is sounding very productive.

  2. March 29, 2007 2:18 am

    Stuart,

    We’ve availed ourselves of this technique before….trouble is, it does have to be done incrementally as I clear the veggie beds (still waiting for tomatoes to ripen!). To amend the football clique – it’s one bed at a time. Not sure if I’m giving it 100% though.

    Yeah the garden sounds productive, I’m hoping it lives up to its own press. (my expectations)
    I did notice more earthworms as I turned over the soil before digging in the compost.

    Good sign I think.

  3. March 30, 2007 11:17 am

    Yes. It does look steep – but beautiful. What is that interesting plant?

  4. March 30, 2007 12:01 pm

    Melissa,

    That plant is Sword grass (or sedge) Gahnia Sieberiana. It is a local native plant. They grow on seepage lines. Down below my house,about 100m into the valley/gully, is a Popes Glen Creek, so until the drought-like conditions, the yard was quite swampy in places. The foliage is quite sharp and snakes like to shelter underneath it in summer time.

    This gahnia (+ many others) was here when we bought the house. The only credit we can take is the massive amount of weeding done (holly, cotoneaster, privet and such removed by hand + no poison due to the afore mentioned seepage lines) that has given it some space to look so elegant.

    I really love this plant.

  5. March 30, 2007 1:08 pm

    (In answer to the comment you left at Zanthan Gardens…) Well, AJM didn’t have to work last weekend so I did get him to spend some of it moving mulching. (Coincidentally he told me he was going to have to work this coming weekend. Hmmm.)

    My problem with getting other people to help with moving mulch is that I spend so much time getting places ready for them and otherwise supervising that it doesn’t seem to save me much time.

    I’m glad that we don’t have your steep hill to contend with!

  6. March 30, 2007 10:51 pm

    The ‘mulch-moving party’ idea came form Stuart….I agree with the organising sentiments.

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