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Autumn on the way

March 14, 2007

It’s starting to get cooler overnight.  Mushrooms and assorted fungi have been appearing for the last few weeks. I’ve pulled out non-producing tomato plants – the Brandywine tomatoes were a non-event.  This was a great shame since I was very keen to try them after reading Joan Dye Gussow’s book.  The Tigerella tomaotes are slowly ripening.  The few we’ve eaten have been the perfect combination of tart and juicy.  I didn’t expect the seeds to germinate, as I’d had them for a long time and hadn’t stored them in optimum conditions.  The yields haven’t been spectacular but we are just lucky that we can go to the shops to buy food.

This makes me think of my forebears who were subsistance farmers – Croatian peasants. They knew both crop failure and hunger.  Although there were shops, without surplus to sell, you had nothing to buy it with.  You needed great skill to live that life.They could make everything from cheeses to ropes.  I recall the stories told by my parents and am in awe.   I like to think my gardening (among other things) is an attempt to continue those skills.

To increase yields and plant health, I need to improve the soil – it’s very sandy. Most garden beds will get the green manure legume treatment (over winter) to prepare for spring planting.

There is always something to do.

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. March 15, 2007 9:17 pm

    I love the new digs. Noice. Unusual. Different.

    I think you’ll find WordPress a much nicer environment (not to mention a great deal more stable than Blogger).

    Living off the land (even if you have water) is very difficult. I have fond (foggy) memories from my childhood of my Grandfather and his little quarter-acre plot. He used to successfully grow all the vegetables and fruit he and Grandma needed – they only bought meat and milk. They had chooks as well, and somewhere I have a photo of him holding me and a chook (which it looks like I’m attempting to strangle).

    I always wanted chooks.

  2. Nada permalink
    March 16, 2007 3:08 am

    We are going to get a few. I’m just waiting for the coop to be finalised/assembled.

    I am a bit worried about predators like foxes,snakes and bloody goannas (yes!) which apparently are very fond of eggs.

    We had chooks in suburban Sydney when I was a kid – rooster and all. One rooster was particularly fierce and on one occassion chased my sister and me. We bolted to the back door screaming, struggled with the screen door and got into the house just as he flew up, spurs poised. He had been tolersted for a long time but really that sealed his fate.

  3. March 16, 2007 4:05 am

    I was once attacked by a goose. Geese are very fierce. They can also shit on you from a great distance.

  4. lidna permalink
    March 16, 2007 8:00 am

    Chooks! Yay!
    According to James, geese make great house guards, much like dogs.They even honk and wag their tails when you get home. Geesy geese!
    We went walking on Wimbledon Common yesterday – no wombles to report, but totally different geese. They are apparently Canada geese. And the crows are smaller and sound like an Edgar Allen Poe pome.

  5. Nada permalink
    March 16, 2007 10:16 am

    Will you be there for the tennis, Linda dear?

    I’d love for you or James to be part of the Lleyton Hewitt “Come on” crowd! It’d be noice, different and unusual.

    Has anyone ever died from a geese attack i wonder? Can they go crazy – I’m thinking of Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren?

  6. lidna permalink
    March 18, 2007 8:14 pm

    We’ll be just across the way, in Richmond, home of Kew Gardens and Richmond Park – the biggest in London. It has deer! And perhaps antelope! Playing!
    “Geese, the musical” – what do you think?

  7. March 19, 2007 7:29 am

    I think geese start at crazy.

    It’s all downhill toward psycho from there.

    How about ‘Friday the 13th Part XXVI – Goosed!’

  8. March 19, 2007 12:52 pm

    Horror musical…hasn’t that territory already been staked out by Andrew Lloyd Webber?

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